It is believed that the island has been rising … You … Depositional Environment.

GEOLOGY OF THE PALOS VERDES PENINSULA LOS ANGELES CA A FIELD GUIDE FOR THE NON-GEOLOGIST Dr. Brendan McNulty Department of Earth Science California State University Dominguez Hills Project funded the CSUDH Presidential Creative Initiative Fund June 2012 . The fault has been active since the Miocene and is a major regional seismic source. Palos Verdes Fault An offshore fault that mostly travels along the Orange County coast, the Palos Verdes Fault runs aground right through the Port of Los Angeles. The Palos Verdes Fault (PVF) is one of few active faults in Southern California that crosses the shoreline and can be studied using both terrestrial and subaqueous methodologies. The Palos Verdes Fault (PVF) is one of few active faults in Southern California that crosses the shoreline and can be studied using both terrestrial and subaqueous methodologies.

The Palos Verdes Hills are part of an uplifted block, with a northwest trend, bounded on the northeast by the Palos Verdes fault zone.

The Palos Verdes fault is an oblique-slip fault, with a ratio of strike-slip to dip-slip of 10:1, a relatively small dip-slip component, but yet enough to a) create the Palos Verdes hills, b) uplift the Monterey Formation from a marine to a terrestrial setting and c) create 13 marine terraces via sequential uplift. The Palos Verdes Fault (PVF) is an active northwest‐southeast trending right‐lateral strike‐slip fault that involves onshore and offshore sections, extending from northern Santa Monica Bay, across the Palos Verdes Peninsula, and offshore again across the San Pedro Shelf and Slope (Figure 1). 1) Local map of the South Bay Los Angeles area (directions to each stop are described in detail below). An offshore fault that mostly travels along the Orange County coast, the Palos Verdes Fault runs aground right through the Port of Los Angeles.

The largest earthquake within 30 miles of Rancho Palos Verdes, CA was a 5.7 Magnitude in 1987. Fig. Additional publication details. The magnitude 3.4 temblor, probably associated with the Palos Verdes Fault, hit the area with a sharp punch about 4 p.m. By Josh Grossberg, Daily Breeze Well, it may have been a tiny one, but it was my first and it was due to our own Palos Verdes Fault. It caused the devastation in Long Beach in 1933. Type of Faulting: right-normal (?) The fault goes out to sea at RAT beach and heads North past Redondo Beach, Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach and El Segundo. In 2017, the USGS gave a report on a hypothetical M7.3 earthquake on the Palos Verdes Fault that would deliver a “direct hit” on the port, estimating that it would kill 200 people and decimate over 2,000 buildings. Evidence for recent movement along these faults is equivocal, because we lack age dates on deformed or offset sediment.
Depositional Environment. The Palos Verdes fault is predominantly a strike-slip fault but has a small vertical component about 10% to 15%.

The Palos Verdes fault is an oblique-slip fault, with a ratio of strike-slip to dip-slip of 10:1, a relatively small dip-slip component, but yet enough to a) create the Palos Verdes hills, b) uplift the Monterey Formation from a marine to a terrestrial setting and c) create 13 marine terraces via sequential uplift. The Palos Verdes fault (PVF) is an active structure in southern California comprised of several segments that together form a complex fault system. The exact land route of the Palos Verdes Fault has been erased by years of paved streets, housing developments and land modifications, said Tom Henyey, director of the Southern California Earthquake Center at USC. The Palos Verdes Peninsula (from Spanish Palos Verdes "Green sticks") is a landform and a geographic sub-region of the Los Angeles metropolitan area, within southwestern Los Angeles County in the U.S. state of California. According to a Southern California Earthquake Center scientist interviewed for a previous Ask Us column, the P.V.

Rancho Palos Verdes, CA has a very high earthquake risk, with a total of 2,563 earthquakes since 1931. Palos Verdes is much safer than the LA Basin as you said. The Palos Verdes Peninsula is part of an extensive, mostly submarine terrane where Middle Miocene and younger sediments lie unconformably on a tectonically disrupted basement of Mesozoic Catalina Schist (Platt, 1975; Howell and Vedder, 1981).